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But other files released yesterday include some 73 git repositories exposing what appears to be source code for the Ashley Madison web site and mobile property.Though the content of these will be of little interest to most journalists, they pose a threat to what's left of ALM's business, since other attackers can now study the code for vulnerabilities they could use to exploit and further subvert the site, making it difficult for ALM to ensure continuing customers that their data is secure.This kind of attack targets a vulnerability in a software application running on the site in order to cause the site's backend SQL databases to spill their data. You could use Pass1234 from the internet to VPN to root on all servers."In an initial interview after the breach was first reported in July, Avid Life Media CEO Noel Biderman suggested the perpetrator may have been a former contractor or someone else who had legitimate access to the company’s networks at one time."We’re on the doorstep of [confirming] who we believe is the culprit,..." Biderman told Krebson Security last month.

But the latest dump, released Thursday and today, could prove to be more embarrassing and harmful to Ashley Madison's business than its customers.The release of source code is also problematic for another reason—it exposes the company's intellectual property to anyone who wants to design a similar business.For a company that had hoped to raise 0 million for an IPO on the London Stock Exchange this fall, that's a potentially big blow."With this second data dump, I believe Impact Team wants to destroy Ashley Madison and Avid Life Media," says Per Thorsheim, a security researcher in Norway who has been analyzing the data. In an interview with Motherboard, the hackers said they have 300 GB of employee emails in their possession, plus tens of thousands of Ashley Madison user pictures as well as user messages."1/3 of pictures are dick pictures and we won't dump," they told Motherboard. Maybe other executives."None of this bodes well for other companies who may engage in practices that hackers don't like.And they published the data via a Tor server, which gives them anonymity as long as they didn't make mistakes."If the attacker took proper OPSEC precautions while setting up the server, law enforcement and AM may never find them," Cabetas observed in his blog post."If [the hackers are] going to get popped by law enforcement, it's going to be analysis of their multiple manifestos," Cabetas suspects.

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